Love, InshAllah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women

Posted by admin | Posted in Love | Posted on 14-04-2012-05-2008

2

Click here for "The Free , TV, Games, Radio Toolbar".

.

Love, InshAllah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women

Love, InshAllah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women

Romance, dating, and – Muslim women? In this groundbreaking collection, 25 American Muslim writers sweep aside stereotypes to share their search for love openly for the first time, showing just how varied the search for love can be–from singles’ events and online dating, to college flirtations and arranged marriages, all with a uniquely Muslim twist.  
These stories are filled with passion and hope, loss and longing: A quintessential blonde California girl travels abroad to escape suffocating responsibilities at home, only to fall in love with a handsome Brazilian stranger she may never see again. An orthodox African-American woman must face her growing attraction to her female friend. A young girl defies her South Asian parents’ cultural expectations with an interracial relationship. And a Southern woman agrees to consider an arranged marriage, with surprising results.  
These compelling stories of love and romance create an irresistible balance of heart-warming and tan

List Price: $ 15.95

Price: $ 9.68

Click here for "The Free , TV, Games, Radio Toolbar".

VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.21_1169]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Comments posted (2)

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
A remarkably candid, courageous, and soul-stirring collection., February 1, 2012
By 
Sarah

This review is from: Love, InshAllah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women (Paperback)

(This review was originally published on my blog A Muslimah Writes)

With the very conscious agenda to dismantle stereotypes and perceptions about Muslim women and love, Love InshAllah gives a glimpse into the richness, plurality, and self-actualization inherent within American Muslim women’s love lives. It holds the enormous potential to astonish both Muslim and non-Muslim audiences, albeit for different reasons. This post is one Muslim woman’s reaction to reading about her fellow Muslimahs’ love lives in this remarkably candid, courageous, and soul-stirring collection.

Love, InshAllah, at first, brought me face-to-face with a glaring prejudice I have unconsciously created about what for me is fair game for love stories.

When Bollywood started to produce that involved more explicit love scenes, I remember my best friend, the least prejudiced person I know, saying “Aurgh, I don’t want to see that!” I chuckled: “So, what, it’s okay if white people do that onscreen?” She tried to explain what she felt: “No, but that’s brown people. That’s us!” Thanks to the media’s disproportionate portrayal of what particular acts should look like or whom they should involve, having intimacy is being acted out by people of “our kind” can be temporarily disorienting for even the least ideologically prudish Indo-Pakistani Muslim ladies like myself.

I confess that, on some level, that’s what I was feeling when I read Love, InshAllah. It’s one thing to know, abstractly, that those stories are out there. Before reading this collection, I did know about gay Muslimahs, about the niqabis who have multiple sexual partners, about Muslim children having to live dual lives because they could not conform to their parents’ standards. But it’s one thing to have these faint blobs of abstraction floating around in one’s consciousness. And it’s quite another to be reading a succession of those stories by the women who own them. For reading such works constituted an experience I could never have readied myself for.

I, of course, mean that in the best way possible.

Being a single person who’s been feeling a bit shortchanged in the love department lately, I did at times have to face the demon of loneliness while reading the stories. And being a Muslimah-which for me means having an inner universe that is shaped and conditioned by the moral tenets of the Islamic faith-means that the moral quandaries raised in some of those stories make reading them a gut-wrenchingly conflicted experience. Yet, ultimately, reading Love, InshAllah created a glowing, steadily increasing burn of recognition of myself in the stories as a whole.

The beauty of this collection lies in how pluralistic it is, and how any attempt to explain the experience of reading these stories will fail to do justice to this collection in its entirety. Therefore, I have decided attempt to group the stories based on my experience of reading them. These categories are far from perfect, but they help provide some insight into how varied the reading experience can get within the scope of such a collection.

1. Deceptively Traditional Stories: These stories moved me because they revealed the beauty of what might, on the surface, seem to be unappealing ways to meet a significant other. Aisha Saeed’s “Leap of Faith” is a dream for any South Asian girl who’s had to go through strangeness of having her parents play matchmaker. “Otherwise Engaged” is an endearing account of Huda Al-Marashi’s yearning for a date with and formal proposal from the boy she was set up to marry.

2. Too Good to Be True Stories: Stories that seemed too good to be true to the point of irrelevance. Although I recognize that they were a necessary part of the collection and are as true as the other stories, they’re not the kind of situations most Muslim women are lucky enough to be in. Ayesha Mattu’s “The Opening” and Angela Collins Telles’ “Love in the Andes” both involved meeting gorgeous non-Muslim men who ended up converting to Islam. Again, while I’m extremely happy for them and for all the women who have been so blessed, I’m too aware of the thornier issue of women who fall in love with good, worthy non-Muslim and are forced to choose between love and deen.

3. Stories that are Not for the Faint-hearted: This collection of stories are better skipped by those who are squeamish, especially about Muslim women. In Tanzila Ahmed’s “Punk-Drunk Love,” Taqwacore sensibility intersects with the heartbreak and the transience of intense passion in a way that that seared my heart. Najva Sol’s “The First Time” recounts her coming to an understanding about her sexuality in a way that pulls no punches.

4. The Real Stuff of Married Life Stories: These stories dealt with what married life (as far as I can tell) is really made up of. Melody Moezzi’s “Love in the Time of Biohazards” is a beautiful portrayal of true…

Read more

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No

VA:F [1.9.21_1169]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VA:F [1.9.21_1169]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
Unique yet relatable, January 21, 2012
By 

This review is from: Love, InshAllah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women (Paperback)

I must admit that I was expecting some typically similar and sugar-coated
stories with cheesy endings (yawn). To my surprise, each story was
strikingly unique, heart-felt, and honest. Most importantly, the stories
were well-written and captivating. Once I started reading the anthology, I could not stop.

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No

VA:F [1.9.21_1169]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VA:F [1.9.21_1169]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Write a comment

*

base64_decode

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Switch to our mobile site

Get Adobe Flash player