Da Capo

Posted by admin | Posted in Love | Posted on 06-10-2010-05-2008

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Da Capo

Their second album, from November 1966, featuring the explosive “7 & 7 Is,” a Top 40 hit in 1966 and an all-time garage-punk classic. Exact repro from the analog masters!Jimi Hendrix wasn’t the only black musician making inspired psychedelic rock in 1967. Memphis-born, L.A.-bred Arthur Lee combined his flair for Technicolor R&B with Bryan MacLean’s talent for ornate show tunes to form a wonderfully schizophrenic combination in Love. The group’s second album boasted such strange but memorable tunes as “7 and 7 Is,” “Orange Skies,” and “She Comes in Colors,” which Lee said was quite literally about making love to a woman who had her period. The album was capped off by the epic, 19-minute upside-down and inside-out blues, “Revelation,” which was produced by an uncredited Neil Young. Jim Derogatis

Rating: (out of 46 reviews)

List Price: $ 14.98

Price: $ 6.51

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Review by elizabeth for Da Capo
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This cd is truly a measure of how big a Love fan you are… 6 of the 7 tracks from _Da Capo_ appear on the excellent _Love Story_ anthology, so if you’re buying this for “Revelation”, I think the word “fanatic” can safely be applied to you (grin).Personally, I think the seven-person lineup heard here was Love’s best. Side one is perhaps the best 17 minutes of the group ever made. The arrival of Tijay Cantrelli (woodwinds) and Michael Stuart (drums) really expanded their sound and raised the level of musicianship. Nowhere is this more eveident than on “Revelation”, that sprawling reminder of a bygone era. The song is too long and never really goes anywhere, but Stuart’s drumming and Cantrelli’s saxophone solo are definitely worth listening for (John Echolls complains loudly in the liner notes that Paul Rothschild ruined the song by moving sections of it around, but, really, it’s hard to imagine it having turned out too much differently).As always, Rhino’s packaging and sound are excellent. I thought hearing the remastered stereo mix would prove them wrong for having used the mono one on _Love Story_, but… they were right, the mono does sound better (except “Revelation”).

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Review by Tezcatlipoca for Da Capo
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Love’s first album had its moments but was possibly too much of a muchness with some of the folk rock numbers being too similar among themselves.”Da Capo’s”diversity is its winning point with each song having a distinctive identity. That said,only”Revelation”,a 19 minute jam,is a half realized concept,for the remaining 6 tracks all reach glorious heights.STEPHANIE KNOWS WHO-Deft time changes power this rocker.Possibly the closest to their first album,though more embelished than any track on their rough edged debut.
ORANGE SKIES-A jazzy,laid back melody showcasing Arthur Lee’s dexterity.Moreover it presents us with the inspired image”Orange Skies,carnivals and cotton candy and you”.
QUE VIDA!-This spanish flavored tune is another standout.The guitar riff driving this song is as beautiful as it is superb.
7&7IS-Proto Punk,a relentless 2 minute assault with werdifying guitars and a bass with an odd revving vibe as backdrop to Arthur’s sped up vocals.It turned out to be Love’s only hit single.The remaster’s liner notes cleared up at last the meaning of the decades long mystery”My dad’s is in the fireplace and my dog lies hypnotized”(it turned out to be quite simple,you’ll see when you read it)
THE CASTLE-75% of this song is instrumental but since the interplay between the guitar,the bass and the harpsichord is so close to perfection it would be unfair to ask for more.
SHE COMES IN COLOURS-One of Love’s top compositions and the album’s high water-mark.From the emotionladen vocals to the strangely adequate flute nothing here descends below excellence.
REVELATION-Love decided to recreate on an album their onstage gimmick in which every element of the band had his moment in the spotlight.Predictably the magic didn’t pass entirely unto the the recording.Moments of brilliance are interspersed with tedious and redundant segments giving “Revelation”a flawed final form.
“Da Capo” and its successor,the celebrated “Forever Changes”,still come through(more than 30 years after after their release)as the most vibrantly original works released in the 60′s.
The Beatles had a more coherent career but Love’s best work can feasibly surpass the Fab4′s best releases.
Essential Stuff.

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Review by musicfan for Da Capo
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Love are a really great and important band with every right to at least two slots in your CD rack. Da Capo is not, for me at least, such a rounded masterpiece as Forever Changes but however easy it may be to pick fault in “Revelation” all of the songs on the first side of Da Capo are perfectly crafted pop gems. I noticed that a couple of other reviewers thought that “Stephanie knows who” sounds like “What’s new Pussycat”. I must admit that I thought exactly the same thing, although the opener to Love’s second album is certainly less innocent than Tom Jones’ playful pop tune. “Orange skies” is sublime, as is “iQUE VIDA!”. “Seven and seven is” (later covered by the Ramones) is a brilliant two minute torrent of proto-punk angst, topped off with a nuclear ending. “The Castle” is a lesson in jam-packed-with-melody three minute songs and “She comes in colours” has a hookline that boast one of pop’s most unusual lyrics: “Whoa,whoa,whoa, my love she comes in colours/you can tell her from the clothes she wears”. I’m pretty sure I’ve never heard a song with that particular subject matter. That’s side one, superb song writing, dreamy arrangements and hippy lyrics. The reason I can’t give Da Capo five stars is for the weaker parts of “revelation”. It contains a lot of very listenable jamming, along the same lines as the Stone’s “Goin’ home”. Then Arthur Lee takes the liberty of screaming for a few minutes. He sounds like a socially retarded, almost unbearably obnoxious and audacious, bearded hippy having a very loud orgasm. This is just not acceptable. It’s not that I’m against people having orgasms on record (Clare Torry does it to great effect on Darkside of the Moon) but Lee sounds like such an imbecile and creates so little melody that all it does here is make you feel embarassed on his behalf. Anyway, the rest of the track is much more enyoyable. A great sax break followed by a listenable, but ultimately pointless, drum solo and then a few seconds of pompous harpsichord rubbish and its done. It has its moments but side two is nowhere near as good as side one. Still, Da Capo is a great pop record that I highly recommend to Forever Changes fans. Thankfully, Lee gave up making sexual noises and frequently shouting “yeah!” for the classic follow-up, Forever Changes.

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Review by for Da Capo
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The first six songs on “Da Capo” are some of the best rock ever recorded. I love “Que Vida” and “She Comes In Colors” and “The Castle” as much as any songs I know. A far greater listener than I, Richard Meltzer, said in an interview a few years back that Love and Moby Grape were the best of the wave of bands that followed the Beatles. I would have to agree. It’s strange, really–the best bands of the 1960s were mostly from the West Coast. The Beach Boys, The Byrds, Love and Moby Grape: add the Beatles and the Stones and that’s pretty much the classic rock groups. “Da Capo” certainly is as inspired a piece of rock and roll as anything by the Beatles, for sure; I enjoy it lots more than “Revolver.” The sound: sort of like Johnny Mathis imitating Mick Jagger imitating Rufus Thomas, with Bacharachesque muzak touches, flutes, and a weird L.A. veneer (see Barney Hoskyns’ book “Waiting For The Sun”). The instrumental, “Revelation,” is perfectly tolerable blues-rock jamming.

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Review by Randall M. Benton for Da Capo
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After the excellent, self-titled debut, it was hard to imagine that Arthur Lee and LOVE could top their pro-punkish selves on their second effort. While “Da Capo” is not as hard-edged and raw as “Love” was, it still packs plenty of punch.

This album is worth buying just for the over-the-top rampage of “7 And 7 Is.” This track alone is so far ahead of its time (an influential to boot) it became a true blueprint for what the punks of the 70′s were trying to build on. The Pistols, Ramones, Television and Clash all owed a lot of their material and sound to this song and this band. (Their have been many excellent covers of this song; the best being from Alice Cooper on 1981′s “Special Forces.”)

“Stephanie Knows Who,” “Orange Skies,” “The Castle,” and “She Comes In Colors” are all excellent and (individually and collectively) can hold their own against anything in the bands catalog. “Revelation,” which took up the entire second side of the original album, has often been critisized as being bloated, unessissary, and non-essential. However, the more you hear it the more it shows its merit. It may very well be the weakest track, but it is worthwhile as the Arthur and company try to spread their creative wings a bit and get away from the three-minute sing format.

Love would next go on to create their masterpiece, “Forever Changes.” But, “Da Capo” was an essential second step in the creative process for this top shelf band of the psychedelic era. Love far outdistanced most of their contemporaries in almost every way. “Da Capo” is proof positive of that.

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